2017 Photo Workshops

Below is a list of confirmed photo workshops for the 2017 Atlanta Photojournalism Seminar:

Yunghi Kim

Yunghi Kim

Yunghi Kim is a photojournalist who has covered conflicts and in-depth, issue-driven stories all over the world for more than three decades. Intimate storytelling and giving a voice to her subjects through the camera remain important to her.

Kim came to the United States from her native South Korea at age 10. She graduated from Boston University in 1984 and began her career as a photographer at The Patriot Ledger in Quincy, Mass. She was the first female photographer hired in the photography department. She then went on to a position staff photographer at The Boston Globe for seven years. Kim was a member of Contact Press Images in 1995 to 2008 and is presently a Special Contributor.

A turning point in Kim’s career came in 1992 when she was covering the famine in Somalia for The Globe. She and a reporter were pinned down by heavy fighting and then taken hostage by warlord Siad Hersey Morgan. Intervention by the United Nations and the aid group, CARE, resulted in their rescue after 13 hours in captivity. Kim returned to Somalia a few days later to complete her assignment. She returned months later to cover the entry of US troops into the region. Her coverage of the Somali famine was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize that year.

Kim remains proudest of her documentation of the lives of former South Korean Comfort Women. These women, affectionately called grandmothers, were forced into sexual slavery by the Japanese army during its occupation of Korea during World War II. In 1996 her photo essay was published worldwide and helped introduce the Comfort Women to the West. After publication, the Japanese government eventually issued a verbal apology to South Korea that included a promise to account for this atrocity in Japanese historical texts. Her work was the first intimate, behind-the-scenes profile of the grandmothers.

Kim has received some of the profession’s highest accolades, it include World Press Photo Awards, POYi awards including Magazine Photographer of the Year by POYi (one of two woman ever to receive it), The Olivier Rebbot and The John Faber Awards from the Overseas Press Club, Visa D’Or for News from the Visa Pour L’image in France, The White House Press Photographers, Boston Press Photographers Association, Communication in Arts and Society for News Design, recipient of Distinguished Alumni Award from Boston University.

Kim has also served as a speaker at the Nieman Narrative Journalism Conference at Harvard University. Past appointed member of NPPA Board of Directors (National Press Photographers Association), 2012 recipient of the United Nations’ Leadership Award in the field of photography by The International Photographic Council. She has also served on the faculty of World Press Photo, Eddie Adams and Missouri Photo Workshop.

In 2015 and 2016, Yunghi Grant was formed, Kim paid it forward with $10,000 grant to photojournalists. Ten selected photojournalists received $1000 each from money Kim recouped from unauthorized use of her work to bring awareness of copyright education. For this she was 2016 recipient of NPPA’s The Clifton Edom Award that recognized an “individual who inspire and motivate members of the photojournalism community to reach new heights.”

John Nowak

John Nowak

John Nowak lives in Atlanta, meaning that the Atlanta Photojournalism Seminar does not have to pay for his hotel room. He spent several years as a photojournalist but long periods of abuse, poor pay, and too many dudes asking gear questions led him to commercial photography. He is generally against bribes unless they are in the form of Twizzlers.








Richard Liebowitz

Richard Liebowitz

Richard P. Liebowitz, Esq., is a seasoned New York attorney who focuses on intellectual property law, related to copyrights and trademarks, at Liebowitz Law Firm, PLLC. He is a 17-year member of the New York Press Photographers Association (NYPPA) and has produced award-winning photojournalism. A graduate of the University of Pennsylvania and Hofstra Law School, Richard now helps his fellow artists around the globe resolve their intellectual property infringements and protect their work, on a contingency basis. As a fellow photographer, he understands the challenges presented in today’s hi-tech environment and is passionate about helping the creative community.




Alysia Burton Steele

Alysia Burton Steele

There's no need for expensive equipment or major resources to do effective storytelling. All you need is inquisitiveness and a listening ear. Oral histories are important for preserving culture and traditions, and bridging communities together. In this session, University of Mississippi journalism professor Alysia Burton Steele will share work from her book, "Delta Jewels: In Search of My Grandmother's Wisdom." Steele drove 6,000 miles to interview 54 women who talked about life during the Jim Crow era in the Mississippi Delta. Her book is a collection of portraits she took and poignant stories she collected from 54 African American church women, such as a 105-year old woman thrown off a cotton plantation because she refused to have her children pick cotton, to a woman who stormed into telephone company's office and demanded "Mrs." be put next to her name like her White counterparts. From this personal project came an article, from that article came a book, and from that book came a mission to explain the value of oral histories. Everyone has a story worth sharing. Learn how the author gained access to one of the hardest communities in Mississippi and get inspired to do your own project.

Steele worked for over 12 years as a photojournalist at several newspapers, including The Columbus Dispatch and The Atlanta Journal-Constitution where she worked as a picture editor and deputy director of photo. In 2006, she was part of the photo team for The Dallas Morning News that won the Pulitzer Prize in Breaking News for their Hurricane Katrina coverage. She served as one of the picture editors.

She is an assistant professor of journalism at the University of Mississippi’s Meek School of Journalism and New Media in Oxford, Miss. Steele teaches journalism writing, layout and design, audio/video production, photojournalism and the senior capstone technology class. She formed the nonprofit organization Delta Jewels Support Fund in November 2015 and is working to provide academic scholarships to students from Mississippi who record an oral history from an elder and write an essay about the experience.